G-BLASTN 1.1 Released

November 28th, 2013

G-BLASTN is a GPU-accelerated nucleotide alignment tool based on the widely used NCBI-BLAST. G-BLASTN can produce exactly the same results as NCBI-BLAST, and it also has very similar user commands. It also supports a pipeline mode, which can fully use the GPU and CPU resources when handling a batch of medium to large sized queries. Currently, G_BLASTN supports the blastn and megablast modes of NCBI-BLAST. The discontiguous megablast mode is not supported yet. More information: http://www.comp.hkbu.edu.hk/~chxw/software/G-BLASTN.html

CUSHAW: a CUDA compatible short read aligner to large genomes based on the Burrows-Wheeler transform

May 11th, 2012

Abstract:

Motivation: New high-throughput sequencing technologies have promoted the production of short reads with dramatically low unit cost. The explosive growth of short read datasets poses a challenge to the mapping of short reads to reference genomes, such as the human genome, in terms of alignment quality and execution speed.

Results: We present CUSHAW, a parallelized short read aligner based on the compute unified device architecture (CUDA) parallel programming model. We exploit CUDA-compatible graphics hardware as accelerators to achieve fast speed. Our algorithm employs a quality-aware bounded search approach based on the Burrows- Wheeler transform (BWT) and the Ferragina Manzini (FM)-index to reduce the search space and achieve high alignment quality. Performance evaluation, using simulated as well as real short read datasets, reveals that our algorithm running on one or two graphics processing units (GPUs) achieves significant speedups in terms of execution time, while yielding comparable or even better alignment quality for paired-end alignments compared to three popular BWT-based aligners: Bowtie, BWA and SOAP2. CUSHAW also delivers competitive performance in terms of SNP calling for an E.coli test dataset.

Availability: http://cushaw.sourceforge.net.

(Y. Liu, B. Schmidt, D. Maskell: “CUSHAW: a CUDA compatible short read aligner to large genomes based on the Burrows-Wheeler transform”, Bioinformatics, 2012. [DOI])

Sequence Homology Search using Fine-Grained Cycle Sharing of Idle GPUs

October 2nd, 2011

Abstract:

In this paper, we propose a fine-grained cycle sharing (FGCS) system capable of exploiting idle graphics processing units (GPUs) for accelerating sequence homology search in local area network environments. Our system exploits short idle periods on GPUs by running small parts of guest programs such that each part can be completed within hundreds of milliseconds. To detect such short idle periods from the pool of registered resources, our system continuously monitors keyboard and mouse activities via event handlers rather than waiting for a screensaver, as is typically deployed in existing systems. Our system also divides guest tasks into small parts according to a performance model that estimates execution times of the parts. This task division strategy minimizes any disruption to the owners of the GPU resources. Experimental results show that our FGCS system running on two non-dedicated GPUs achieves 111-116% of the throughput achieved by a single dedicated GPU. Furthermore, our system provides over two times the throughput of a screensaver-based system. We also show that the idle periods detected by our system constitute half of the system uptime. We believe that the GPUs hidden and often unused in office environments provide a powerful solution to sequence homology search.

(Fumihiko Ino, Yuma Munekawa, and Kenichi Hagihara, “Sequence Homology Search using Fine-Grained Cycle Sharing of Idle GPUs”, accepted for publication in IEEE Transactions on Parallel and Distributed Systems, Sep. 2011. [DOI])

Accelerating Smith-Waterman on Heterogeneous CPU-GPU Systems

June 26th, 2011

Abstract:

This paper describes the approach and the speedup obtained in performing Smith-Waterman database searches on heterogeneous platforms comprising of multi core CPU and multi GPU systems. Most of the advanced and optimized Smith-Waterman algorithm versions have demonstrated remarkable speedup over NCBI BLAST versions, viz., SWPS3 based on x86 SSE2 instructions and CUDASW++ v2.0 CUDA implementation on GPU. This work proposes a hybrid Smith-Waterman algorithm that integrates the state-of-the art CPU and GPU solutions for accelerating Smith-Waterman algorithm in which GPU acts as a co-processor and shares the workload with the CPU enabling us to realize remarkable performance of over 70 GCUPS resulting from simultaneous CPU-GPU execution. In this work, both CPU and GPU are graded equally in performance for Smith-Waterman rather than previous approaches of porting the computationally intensive portions onto the GPUs or a naive multi-core CPU approach.

(J. Singh and I. Aruni: “Accelerating Smith-Waterman on Heterogeneous CPU-GPU Systems”, Proceedings of Bioinformatics and Biomedical Engineering (iCBBE), May 2011. [DOI])

MUMmerGPU 2: Optimizing data intensive GPGPU computations for DNA sequence alignment

August 31st, 2009

Abstract:

MUMmerGPU uses highly-parallel commodity graphics processing units (GPU) to accelerate the data-intensive computation of aligning next generation DNA sequence data to a reference sequence for use in diverse applications such as disease genotyping and personal genomics. MUMmerGPU 2.0 features a new stackless depth-first-search print kernel and is 13× faster than the serial CPU version of the alignment code and nearly 4× faster in total computation time than MUMmerGPU 1.0. We exhaustively examined 128 GPU data layout configurations to improve register footprint and running time and conclude higher occupancy has greater impact than reduced latency. MUMmerGPU is available open-source at http://www.mummergpu.sourceforge.net.

(Trapnell, C, Schatz, MC (2009) Optimizing data intensive GPGPU computations for DNA sequence alignment. Parallel Computing doi:10.1016/j.parco.2009.05.002)