Fast GPU Debayer Software

March 13th, 2013

The GPU Debayer software developed by Fastvideo can be used for demosaicing of raw 8-bit Bayer images to full-color 24-bit RGB format. The application employs the HQLI and DFPD algorithms and is tuned for NVIDIA GPUs, which results in very fast conversion, e.g., only 1.25 ms for Full HD image demosaicing on GeForce GTX 580. The software is freely available.

An In-GPU-Memory Column-Oriented Database for Processing Analytical Workloads

March 13th, 2013

Abstract:

Due to ever increasing demand for fast processing of large analytical workloads, main memory column-oriented databases have attracted a lot of attention in recent years. In-memory databases eliminate the disk I/O barrier by storing the data in memory. In addition, they utilize a column-oriented data layout to offer a multi-core-friendly and memory-bandwidth-efficient processing scheme. On the other hand, recently, graphics processing un‏its (GPUs) have emerged as powerful tools for general high-performance computing. GPUs are affordable and energy-efficient devices that deliver a massive computational power by utilizing a large number of cores and a high memory bandwidth. GPUs can be used as co-processors for query acceleration of in-memory databases. One of the main bottlenecks in GPU-acceleration of in-memory databases is the need for data to be transferred back and forward between GPU memory and RAM through a low-bandwidth PCIe bus. To address this problem, in this study, a new generation of in-memory databases is proposed that instead of keeping data in main memory stores it in GPU device memory.

(Pedram Ghodsnia: “An In-GPU-Memory Column-Oriented Database for Processing Analytical Workloads”, VLDB 2012 PhD Workshop, Istanbul, Turkey, August 2012. [PDF])

New GPU Computing Webinars

March 3rd, 2013

The following new webinars about NVIDIA Tesla K20 have been announced. During these live webinars, developers will be able to get answers directly from the presenters.

PARALUTION – A fast, user-friendly library for sparse iterative methods on CPUs and GPUs

February 25th, 2013

PARALUTION is a library for sparse iterative methods with special focus on multi-core and accelerator technology such as GPUs. In particular, it incorporates fine-grained parallel preconditioners designed to expolit modern multi-/many-core devices. Based on C++, it provides a generic and flexible design and interface which allow seamless integration with other scientific software packages. The library is open source and released under GPL. Key features are:

  • OpenMP, CUDA and OpenCL support
  • No special hardware/library requirement
  • Portable code and results across all hardware
  • Many sparse matrix formats
  • Various iterative solvers/preconditioners
  • Generic and robust design
  • Plug-in for the finite element package Deal.II
  • Documentation: user manual (pdf), reports, doxygen

More information, including documentation and case studies, is available at http://www.paralution.com.

Lab4241 GP-GPU profiler

February 21st, 2013

A free, pre-alpha release of Lab4241’s GPGPU profiler is now available at www.lab4241.com. It provides source-code-line performance profiling for C or C++ code and CUDA kernels in a non-intrusive way. The profiler enables the developer to a seamless evaluation of used GPU resources (execution counts, memory access, branch diversions, etc.) per source-line, along with result evaluation in a simple, intuitive GUI, similar as with known CPU profilers like Quantify or valgrind.

Free online course on parallel programming on Udacity

February 10th, 2013

This class teaches the fundamentals of parallel computing with the GPU and the CUDA programming environment. Examples are based on a series of image processing algorithms, such as those in Photoshop or Instagram. Programming and running assignments on high-end GPUs is possible, even if you don’t own one yourself. The course started Monday 4th Feb 2013 so there is still time to join. More information and enrollment: https://www.udacity.com/course/cs344.

Generation of large finite-element matrices on multiple graphics processors

February 7th, 2013

Abstract:

The paper presents techniques for generating very large finite-element matrices on a multicore workstation equipped with several graphics processing units (GPUs). To overcome the low memory size limitation of the GPUs, and at the same time to accelerate the generation process, we propose to generate the large sparse linear systems arising in finite-element analysis in an iterative manner on several GPUs and to use the graphics accelerators concurrently with CPUs performing collection and addition of the matrix fragments using a fast multithreaded procedure. The scheduling of the threads is organized in such a way that the CPU operations do not affect the performance of the process, and the GPUs are idle only when data are being transferred from GPU to CPU. This approach is verified on two workstations: the first consists of two 6-core Intel Xeon X5690 processors with two Fermi GPUs: each GPU is a GeForce GTX 590 with two graphics processors and 1.5 GB of fast RAM; the second workstation is equipped with two Tesla C2075 boards carrying 6 GB of RAM each and two 12-core Opteron 6174s. For the latter setup, we demonstrate the fast generation of sparse finite-element matrices as large as 10 million unknowns, with over 1 billion nonzero entries. Comparing with the single-threaded and multithreaded CPU implementations, the GPU-based version of the algorithm based on the ideas presented in this paper reduces the finite-element matrix-generation time in double precision by factors of 100 and 30, respectively.

(Dziekonski, A., Sypek, P., Lamecki, A. and Mrozowski, M.: “Generation of large finite-element matrices on multiple graphics processors”. International Journal on Numerical Methoths in Engineering, 2012, in press. [DOI])

A scalable, numerically stable, high-performance tridiagonal solver using GPUs

January 29th, 2013

Abstract:

In this paper, we present a scalable, numerically stable, high-performance tridiagonal solver. The solver is based on the SPIKE algorithm for partitioning a large matrix into small independent matrices, which can be solved in parallel. For each small matrix, our solver applies a general 1-by-1 or 2-by-2 diagonal pivoting algorithm, which is also known to be numerically stable. Our paper makes two major contributions. First, our solver is the first numerically stable tridiagonal solver for GPUs. Our solver provides comparable quality of stable solutions to Intel MKL and Matlab, at speed comparable to the GPU tridiagonal solvers in existing packages like CUSPARSE. It is also scalable to multiple GPUs and CPUs. Second, we present and analyze two key optimization strategies for our solver: a high-throughput data layout transformation for memory efficiency, and a dynamic tiling approach for reducing the memory access footprint caused by branch divergence.

(Chang, Li-Wen and Stratton, John A. and Kim, Hee-Seok and Hwu, Wen-mei W.: “A scalable, numerically stable, high-performance tridiagonal solver using GPUs”, Supercomputing 2012. [WWW])

Parallel Computing Training Dates from AccelerEyes

January 29th, 2013

AccelerEyes has released dates for their upcoming CUDA and OpenCL training courses.

CUDA

OpenCL

More information can be found on the courses’ webpages.

Acceleware parallel programming courses

January 25th, 2013

Acceleware has recently announced four courses on parallel programming:

More information is available on the courses’ webpages.

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