Generating Efficient Quantum Chemistry Codes for Novel Architectures

November 8th, 2012

Abstract:

We describe an extension of our graphics processing unit (GPU) electronic structure program TeraChem to include atom-centered Gaussian basis sets with d angular momentum functions. This was made possible by a “meta-programming” strategy that leverages computer algebra systems for the derivation of equations and their transformation to correct code. We generate a multitude of code fragments that are formally mathematically equivalent, but differ in their memory and floating-point operation footprints. We then select between different code fragments using empirical testing to find the highest performing code variant. This leads to an optimal balance of floating-point operations and memory bandwidth for a given target architecture without laborious manual tuning. We show that this approach is capable of similar performance compared to our hand-tuned GPU kernels for basis sets with s and p angular momenta. We also demonstrate that mixed precision schemes (using both single and double precision) remain stable and accurate for molecules with d functions. We provide benchmarks of the execution time of entire self-consistent field (SCF) calculations using our GPU code and compare to mature CPU based codes, showing the benefits of the GPU architecture for electronic structure theory with appropriately redesigned algorithms. We suggest that the meta-programming and empirical performance optimization approach may be important in future computational chemistry applications, especially in the face of quickly evolving computer architectures.

(Alexey V Titov , Ivan S. Ufimtsev , Nathan Luehr  and Todd J. Martínez: “Generating Efficient Quantum Chemistry Codes for Novel Architectures”, accepted for publication in the Journal of Chemical Theory and Computation, 2012. [DOI])

Policy-based Tuning for Performance Portability and Library Co-optimization

July 22nd, 2012

Abstract:

Although modular programming is a fundamental software development practice, software reuse within contemporary GPU kernels is uncommon. For GPU software assets to be reusable across problem instances, they must be inherently flexible and tunable. To illustrate, we survey the performance-portability landscape for a suite of common GPU primitives, evaluating thousands of reasonable program variants across a large diversity of problem instances (microarchitecture, problem size, and data type). While individual specializations provide excellent performance for specific instances, we find no variants with universally reasonable performance. In this paper, we present a policy-based design idiom for constructing reusable, tunable software components that can be co-optimized with the enclosing kernel for the specific problem and processor at hand. In particular, this approach enables flexible granularity coarsening which allows the expensive aspects of communication and the redundant aspects of data parallelism to scale with the width of the processor rather than the problem size. From a small library of tunable device subroutines, we have constructed the fastest, most versatile GPU primitives for reduction, prefix and segmented scan, duplicate removal, reduction-by-key, sorting, and sparse graph traversal.

(Duane Merrill, Michael Garland and Andrew Grimshaw, “Policy-based Tuning for Performance Portability and Library Co-optimization”, Innovative Parallel Computing 2012. [WWW])

VexCL: Vector expression template library for OpenCL

May 30th, 2012

VexCL is vector expression template library for OpenCL developed by the Supercomputer Center of Russian academy of sciences. It has been created for ease of C++ based OpenCL development. Multi-device (and multi-platform) computations are supported. The code is publicly available under MIT license.

Main features:

  • Selection and initialization of compute devices according to extensible set of device filters.
  • Transparent allocation of device vectors spanning multiple devices.
  • Convenient notation for vector arithmetic, sparse matrix-vector multiplication, reductions. All computations are performed in parallel on all selected devices.
  • Appropriate kernels for vector expressions are generated automatically first time an expression is used.

Doxygen-generated documentation is available at http://ddemidov.github.com/vexcl/index.html.

HONEI: A collection of libraries for numerical computations targeting multiple processor architectures

February 2nd, 2010

Abstract:

We present HONEI, an open-source collection of libraries offering a hardware oriented approach to numerical calculations. HONEI abstracts the hardware, and applications written on top of HONEI can be executed on a wide range of computer architectures such as CPUs, GPUs and the Cell processor. We demonstrate the flexibility and performance of our approach with two test applications, a Finite Element multigrid solver for the Poisson problem and a robust and fast simulation of shallow water waves. By linking against HONEI’s libraries, we achieve a two-fold speedup over straight forward C++ code using HONEI’s SSE backend, and additional 3–4 and 4–16 times faster execution on the Cell and a GPU. A second important aspect of our approach is that the full performance capabilities of the hardware under consideration can be exploited by adding optimised application-specific operations to the HONEI libraries. HONEI provides all necessary infrastructure for development and evaluation of such kernels, significantly simplifying their development.

(Danny van Dyk, Markus Geveler, Sven Mallach, Dirk Ribbrock, Dominik Göddeke and Carsten Gutwenger: HONEI: A collection of libraries for numerical computations targeting multiple processor architectures. Computer Physics Communications 180(12), pp. 2534-2543, December 2009. DOI 10.1016/j.cpc.2009.04.018)

Brahma: Shader meta-programming framework for GPUs

December 13th, 2006

Brahma is an open source shader meta-programming framework for the .NET platform that generates shader code from IL at runtime, enabling developers to write GPU code in C# (or any NET language). The library is primarily meant to handle GPU-based rendering and computational tasks, and eliminates a great deal of glue code that is often required in GPU programming. Since Brahma is a set of interfaces and base classes, it can be implemented for any combination of API and shading language. At this time there is a working shader generation path for Managed DirectX/HLSL. (http://brahma.ananthonline.net)