A Survey Of Architectural Approaches for Data Compression in Cache and Main Memory Systems

May 18th, 2015

Abstract:

As the number of cores on a chip increase and key applications become even more data-intensive, memory systems in modern processors have to deal with increasingly large amount of data. In face of such challenges, data compression presents as a promising approach to increase effective memory system capacity and also provide performance and energy advantages. This paper presents a survey of techniques for using compression in cache and main memory systems. It also classifies the techniques based on key parameters to highlight their similarities and differences. It discusses compression in CPUs and GPUs, conventional and non-volatile memory (NVM) systems, and 2D and 3D memory systems. We hope that this survey will help the researchers in gaining insight into the potential role of compression approach in memory components of future extreme-scale systems.

Sparsh Mittal and Jeffrey Vetter, “A Survey Of Architectural Approaches for Data Compression in Cache and Main Memory Systems”, IEEE TPDS 2015. WWW

A Survey of Techniques For Improving Energy Efficiency in Embedded Computing Systems

February 11th, 2015

Abstract:

Recent technological advances have greatly improved the performance and features of embedded systems. With the number of just mobile devices now reaching nearly equal to the population of earth, embedded systems have truly become ubiquitous. These trends, however, have also made the task of managing their power consumption extremely challenging. In recent years, several techniques have been proposed to address this issue. In this paper, we survey the techniques for managing power consumption of embedded systems. We discuss the need of power management and provide a classification of the techniques on several important parameters to highlight their similarities and differences. This paper also reviews those techniques which use GPU and FPGA to improve energy efficiency of embedded systems. This paper is intended to help the researchers and application-developers in gaining insights into the working of power management techniques and designing even more efficient high-performance embedded systems of tomorrow.

Sparsh Mittal, “A Survey of Techniques For Improving Energy Efficiency in Embedded Computing Systems”, International Journal of Computer Aided Engineering and Technology (IJCAET), vol 6, no. 4, 2014. WWW

A Survey Of Techniques for Managing and Leveraging Caches in GPUs

February 10th, 2015

Abstract:

Initially introduced as special-purpose accelerators for graphics applications, graphics processing units (GPUs) have now emerged as general purpose computing platforms for a wide range of applications. To address the requirements of these applications, modern GPUs include sizable hardware-managed caches. However, several factors, such as unique architecture of GPU, rise of CPU-GPU heterogeneous computing, etc., demand effective management of caches to achieve high performance and energy efficiency. Recently, several techniques have been proposed for this purpose. In this paper, we survey several architectural and system-level techniques proposed for managing and leveraging GPU caches. We also discuss the importance and challenges of cache management in GPUs. The aim of this paper is to provide the readers insights into cache management techniques for GPUs and motivate them to propose even better techniques for leveraging the full potential of caches in the GPUs of tomorrow.

Sparsh Mittal, “A Survey Of Techniques for Managing and Leveraging Caches in GPUs”, Journal of Circuits, Systems, and Computers (JCSC), vol. 23, no. 8, 2014. WWW

A Survey of Methods for Analyzing and Improving GPU Energy Efficiency

February 10th, 2015

Abstract:

Recent years have witnessed a phenomenal growth in the computational capabilities and applications of GPUs. However, this trend has also led to dramatic increase in their power consumption. This paper surveys research works on analyzing and improving energy efficiency of GPUs. It also provides a classification of these techniques on the basis of their main research idea. Further, it attempts to synthesize research works which compare energy efficiency of GPUs with other computing systems, e.g. FPGAs and CPUs. The aim of this survey is to provide researchers with knowledge of state-of-the-art in GPU power management and motivate them to architect highly energy-efficient GPUs of tomorrow.

Sparsh Mittal, Jeffrey S Vetter, “A Survey of Methods for Analyzing and Improving GPU Energy Efficiency”, in ACM Computing Surveys, vol. 47, no. 2, pp. 19:1-19:23, 2014. [WWW]

A Detailed GPU Cache Model Based on Reuse Distance Theory

March 5th, 2014

Abstract:

As modern GPUs rely partly on their on-chip memories to counter the imminent off-chip memory wall, the efficient use of their caches has become important for performance and energy. However, optimising cache locality systematically requires insight into and prediction of cache behaviour. On sequential processors, stack distance or reuse distance theory is a well-known means to model cache behaviour. However, it is not straightforward to apply this theory to GPUs, mainly because of the parallel execution model and fine-grained multi-threading. This work extends reuse distance to GPUs by modelling: 1) the GPU’s hierarchy of threads, warps, threadblocks, and sets of active threads, 2) conditional and non-uniform latencies, 3) cache associativity, 4) miss-status holding-registers, and 5) warp divergence. We implement the model in C++ and extend the Ocelot GPU emulator to extract lists of memory addresses. We compare our model with measured cache miss rates for the Parboil and PolyBench/GPU benchmark suites, showing a mean absolute error of 6% and 8% for two cache configurations. We show that our model is faster and even more accurate compared to the GPGPU-Sim simulator.

(Cedric Nugteren, Gert-Jan van den Braak, Henk Corporaal, Henri Bal: “A Detailed GPU Cache Model Based on Reuse Distance Theory”, in High Performance Computer Architecture (HPCA), 2014, [PDF])

SIMD Re-convergence at Thread Frontiers: A new method for handling branch divergence on GPUs

October 24th, 2011

Abstract:

Hardware and compiler techniques for mapping data-parallel programs with divergent control flow to SIMD architectures have recently enabled the emergence of new GPGPU programming models such as CUDA,  OpenCL, and DirectX Compute. The impact of branch divergence can be quite different depending upon whether the program’s control flow is structured or unstructured. In this paper, we show that unstructured control flow occurs frequently in applications and can lead to significant code expansion when executed using existing approaches for handling branch divergence. This paper proposes a new technique for automatically mapping arbitrary control flow onto SIMD processors that relies on a concept of a “Thread Frontier”, which is a statically bounded region of the program
containing all threads that have branched away from the current warp. This technique is evaluated on a GPU emulator configured to model i) a commodity GPU (Intel Sandybridge), and ii) custom hardware support not realized in current GPU architectures. It is shown that this new technique performs identically to the best existing method for structured control flow, and re-converges at the earliest possible point when executing unstructured control flow. This leads to i) between 1.5-633.2% reductions in dynamic instruction counts for several real applications, ii) simplification of the compilation process, and iii) ability to efficiently add high level unstructured programming constructs (e.g., exceptions) to existing data-parallel languages.

(Gregory Diamos, Benjamin Ashbaugh, Subramaniam Maiyuran, Andrew Kerr, Haicheng Wu and Sudhakar Yalamanchili: “SIMD Re-convergence at Thread Frontiers”. 44th International Symposium on Microarchitecture (MICRO 44), 2011. [WWW])

Scalable instruction set simulator for thousand-core architectures running on GPGPUs.

June 26th, 2011

Abstract:

Simulators are still the primary tools for development and performance evaluation of applications running on massively parallel architectures. However, current virtual platforms are not able to tackle the complexity issues introduced by 1000-core future scenarios. We present a fast and accurate simulation framework targeting extremely large parallel systems by specifically taking advantage of the inherent potential processing parallelism available in modern GPGPUs.

(S. Raghav, M. Ruggiero, D. Atienza, C. Pinto, A. Marongiu and L. Benini: “Scalable instruction set simulator for thousand-core architectures running on GPGPUs”, Proceedings of High Performance Computing and Simulation (HPCS), pp.459-466, June/July 2010. [DOI] [WWW])

Understanding throughput-oriented architectures

November 24th, 2010

Abstract:

For workloads with abundant parallelism, GPUs deliver higher peak computational throughput than latency-oriented CPUs. Key insights of this article: Throughput-oriented processors tackle problems where parallelism is abundant, yielding design decisions different from more traditional latency oriented processors. Due to their design, programming throughput-oriented processors requires much more emphasis on parallelism and scalability than programming sequential processors. GPUs are the leading exemplars of modern throughput-oriented architecture, providing a ubiquitous commodity platform for exploring throughput-oriented programming.

(Michael Garland and David B. Kirk, “Understanding throughput-oriented architectures”, Commununications of the ACM 53(11), 58-66, Nov. 2010. [DOI])

Some older publications worth reading

January 17th, 2010

Occasionally, we receive news submissions pointing us to interesting older papers that somehow slipped by without our notice. This post collects a few of those. If you want your work to be posted on GPGPU.org  in a timely manner, please remember to use the news submission form.

  • Joshua A. Anderson, Chris D. Lorenz and Alex Travesset present and discuss molecular dynamics simulations and compare a single GPU against a 36-CPU cluster (General purpose molecular dynamics simulations fully implemented on graphics processing units, Journal of Computational Physics 227(10), May 2008, DOI 10.1016/j.jcp.2008.01.047).
  • Wen-mei Hwu et al. derive and discuss goals and concepts of programming models for fine-grained parallel architectures, from the point of view of both a programmer and a hardware /compiler designer, and analyze CUDA as one current representative  (Implicitly parallel programming models for thousand-core microprocessors, Proceedings of DAC’07, June 2007, DOI 10.1145/1278480.1278669).
  • Jeremy Sugerman et al. present GRAMPS, a prototype implementation of future graphics hardware that allows pipelines to be specified as graphs in software (GRAMPS: A Programming Model for Graphics Pipelines, ACM Transactions on Graphics 28(1), January 2009, DOI 10.1145/1477926.1477930).
  • William R. Mark discusses concepts of future graphics architectures in this contribution to the 2008 ACM Queue special issue on GPUs (Future graphics architectures, ACM Queue 6(2), March/April 2008,  DOI 10.1145/1365490.1365501).
  • BSGP by Qiming Hou et al. is a new programming language for general purpose GPU computing that achieves the same efficiency as well-tuned CUDA programs but makes code much easier to read, develop and maintain (BSGP: bulk-synchronous GPU programming, ACM Siggraph 2008, August 2008, DOI 10.1145/1399504.1360618).
  • Finally, Che et al. and Garland et al. survey the field of GPU computing and discuss many different application domains. These articles are, in addition to the ones we have collected on the developer pages, recommended to GPGPU newcomers.

A Characterization and Analysis of PTX Kernels

October 1st, 2009

Abstract:

General-purpose application development for GPUs (GPGPU) has recently gained momentum as a cost-effective approach for accelerating data-and compute-intensive applications. It has been driven by the introduction of C-based programming environments such as NVIDIA’s CUDA, OpenCL, and Intel’s Ct. While significant effort has been focused on developing and evaluating applications and software tools, comparatively little has been devoted to the analysis and characterization of applications to assist future work in compiler optimizations, application re-structuring, and micro-architecture design.

This paper proposes a set of metrics for GPU workloads and uses these metrics to analyze the behavior of GPU programs. We report on an analysis of over 50 kernels and applications including the full NVIDIA CUDA SDK and UIUC’s Parboil Benchmark Suite covering control flow, data flow, parallelism, and memory behavior. The analysis was performed using a full function emulator we developed that implements the NVIDIA virtual machine referred to as PTX (Parallel Thread eXecution architecture) – a machine model and low-level virtual ISA that is representative of ISAs for data-parallel execution. The emulator can execute compiled kernels from the CUDA compiler, currently supports the full PTX 1.4 specification, and has been validated against the full CUDA SDK. The results quantify the importance of optimizations such as those for branch re-convergence, the prevalance of sharing between threads, and highlights opportunities for additional parallelism.

(Andrew Kerr, Gregory Diamos, Sudhakar Yalamanchili, A Characterization and Analysis of PTX Kernels. International Symposium on Workload Characterization (IISWC). 2009.)